South Korea's shareholder activism revolution stuck in the slow lane

25 Mar 2019 12:00 am

Duration: 16:22

With Elliott rejected by Hyundai Motor shareholders and KCGI, Korea’s biggest activist fund, legally barred from seeking change at Hanjin KAL, it appears corporate governance will only advance at a pace dictated by Korea’s financial establishment.

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  • South Korea's shareholder activism revolution remains stuck in the slow lane
    This year’s proxy voting season was supposed to be a watershed for South Korean corporate governance, with 11 companies targeted for activism, versus just two in 2018. But with Elliott rejected by Hyundai Motor shareholders and KCGI, Korea’s biggest activist fund, blocked from submitting proposals at next week’s Hanjin KAL vote, it appears activism in Korea will only advance at a pace dictated by Korea’s financial establishment.

Editorial Team