• UK sends EU mixed single-market messages over services
    12 July 2018
    UK prime minister Theresa May has insisted she’s implacably opposed to the UK remaining in the single market after Brexit.

    The plan revealed today is billed as seeking a “common rulebook” — or de facto single market — for goods, while allowing the UK to diverge on services. Indeed, the UK’s ask on services, UK officials said today, does not go much beyond conventional trade agreements.

    If this were the position, it would risk flying in the face of the EU’s plea not to try to split the bloc’s internal market. But the detail of today’s white paper, and recent presentations by British negotiators to the EU, suggests a wish for a much deeper relationship than ministers are willing to advertise.

    By Matthew Holehouse

    To request the full article please click here >

  • UK seeks common subsidy rules, information-sharing in post-Brexit competition regime
    12 July 2018
    The UK wants a new kind of competition relationship with the EU that goes beyond the terms of normal trade deals, according to a government wish-list for a post-Brexit trade deal with Europe.

    The White Paper envisages a “common rulebook” on state aid, as well as provisions for information sharing in competition probes.

    Unveiled today, the paper seeks reciprocal commitments with the EU on competition policy that “go beyond those usually made in Free Trade Agreements.”

    By Lewis Crofts and Michael Acton

    To request the full article please click here >

  • UK paper sets out hopes to stay in single market in goods after Brexit
    12 July 2018
    The UK has set out proposals to remain a de facto participant in the EU's single market for goods, including autos, chemicals, drugs and aerospace engineering.

    It comes in defiance of repeated warnings by the EU not to attempt to “cherry-pick” market access on a sector-by-sector basis, and lays the ground for a major impasse over the coming months.

    The EU has warned that such an approach ignores how the market works as a complex ecosystem of rules, and that financing and intellectual-property rules cannot be meaningfully separated from manufacturing standards.

    By Matthew Holehouse

    To request the full article please click here >

  • UK food-safety agency pitches for post-Brexit regulatory powers
    04 July 2018
    Food companies in the UK should be subject to day-to-day risk management by a boosted national Food Standards Authority after Brexit, according to the head of the regulator for food safety and quality.

    Presenting the case for the FSA to take over much of the decision-making powers that lie currently in the hands of EU bodies, Heather Hancock told lawmakers there should be "as little change as possible" in the risk-management approach in the transition from EU oversight to national responsibilty.

    “There’s no precedent if one is outside the EU for having the full participation and access in all those institutions, and that’s why our focus is being on how we recreate, replicate and rebuild the necessary framework to operate effectively in the UK,” she said.

    By Zosia Wanat

    To request the full article please click here >

  • EU presses for UK Brexit-strategy paper to advance stalled talks
    03 July 2018
    The UK will replicate planned EU measures to shield companies from US sanctions on Iran after Brexit, Trade Secretary Liam Fox said today.

    The European Commission has proposed reactivating a "blocking statute" that would prohibit companies from complying with the provisions of the sanctions outside the borders of the US. The statute would allow companies to seek recovery of damages arising from the US sanctions.

    US President Donald Trump announced in May that his country would pull out from the 2015 Iran nuclear deal and reimpose sanctions. The British government, along with the EU, condemned the move.

    By Matthew Holehouse

    To request the full article please click here >