Antitrust Antitrust

Google parks controversial 'Privacy Sandbox' project as antitrust burdens mount

By Matthew Newman and Mike Swift
  • 24 Jun 2021 12:12
  • 24 Jun 2021 12:40
Google will delay its controversial “Privacy Sandbox” by around 18 months to give publishers more time to adapt their services.

In a blog today, the US search giant said it will delay the start of the project — a phaseout of third-party cookies in its Chrome browser in favor of new technology — from

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Matthew Newman

Chief Correspondent


Matthew Newman is a chief correspondent for MLex and writes about data protection, privacy, telecoms, cyber security and artificial intelligence. Matthew began his journalism career in 1991 in community newspapers. He worked as a reporter in Riga, Latvia in 1993 and then moved to Chicago where he covered local news. In 1995, he became a personal finance reporter for Dow Jones Newswires, and was then transferred to Brussels in 1999. He specialized in EU regulatory affairs, including trade and telecom issues. He began covering competition for Bloomberg News as an EU court reporter in 2004. In 2010, he was named spokesman for Viviane Reding, the EU’s justice commissioner. In January 2012, he helped launch the commission’s proposal to overall data protection rules.

Mike Swift

Chief Global Digital Risk Correspondent


Mike Swift is an award-winning journalist who has been at the forefront of covering data, privacy and cybersecurity regulatory news for more than a decade. As the Chief Global Digital Risk Correspondent for MLex, in addition to reporting, he coordinates MLex’s worldwide coverage in the practice area. Formerly chief Internet reporter for the San Jose Mercury News and SiliconValley.com, Mike has covered Google, Facebook, Apple, Microsoft, Twitter and other tech companies and has closely tracked technology and regulatory trends in Silicon Valley. He has wide ranging expertise from the business of professional sports to computer-assisted reporting. A former John S. Knight Fellow at Stanford University, he is a graduate of Colby College.

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