• Cybersecurity rules lag behind in most EU states, commission warns
    19 July 2018
    Cybersecurity rules at national level are falling short of EU law across the bloc, the European Commission has said.

    The EU executive has sent formal warnings to 17 governments for their failure to transpose into national statute an EU law aimed at protecting information systems by a deadline of May 9.

    Only 11 of the bloc’s 28 members have notified the commission of the full or partial adoption of the directive on the security of Network and Information Systems, or NIS.

    By Cynthia Kroet

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  • Facebook argues users suing over Cambridge Analytica scandal don't have valid privacy claims
    18 July 2018
    Facebook argued that none of the users suing the social network for alleged privacy violations after the Cambridge Analytical scandal have claimed a concrete injury at a case management conference Wednesday.

    The multidistrict litigation in San Francisco federal court is just getting underway, but a federal judge already doubted that all of the plaintiffs' claims would be dismissed.

    Ten plaintiffs’ attorneys presented arguments to US District Judge Vince Chhabria at a case management conference about why they should be chosen lead counsel, highlighting their experience and recent wins, and their tentative strategies for pursuing a case that some argued would shape the future of privacy on the Internet.

    By Amy Miller

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  • Privacy Shield deserves chance after review, Belgian data watchdog says
    03 July 2018
    The EU-US Privacy Shield deal for commercial data transfers should be given a chance to prove its worth, once EU privacy watchdogs have assessed its compliance with new European laws, Belgium's chief privacy regulator has told MLex.

    Willem Debeuckelaere’s comments come just days before EU regulators are set to meet with the US’s interim dispute mediator for the Privacy Shield, and review whether the country is respecting the spirit of the agreement.

    "Personally, I think we should give it a chance," he said. "We have to assess if the Privacy Shield system is an adequate system," said Debeuckelaere, who is also a vice-chairman of the umbrella group of EU privacy regulators, the European Data Protection Board.

    By Vesela Gladicheva

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  • California privacy bill could qualify for EU data-transfer deal, commission official says
    03 July 2018
    A new California privacy law that gives consumers sweeping new protections for their online data could succeed in securing EU approval on commercial data transfers, a European Commission official said today.

    “There are no obstacles to have adequacy,” Bruno Gencarelli told a conference* in Cambridge, UK. This is EU jargon for agreements the commission strikes with countries outside the bloc, recognizing that national laws provide adequate protection of European citizens’ information — such as photos and payslips — when shifted by companies across borders.

    The EU has issued “adequacy” decisions for over a dozen countries such as Argentina, Canada and Israel. The latest agreement was the EU-US Privacy Shield that came into force in 2016 to replace an older accord, which the EU’s highest court had struck down for failing to sufficiently protect citizens’ personal data in the context of access by US intelligence services.

    By Vesela Gladicheva

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  • Irish privacy watchdog analyzing 20 complaints 'as expeditiously as possible'
    03 July 2018
    The entry into force of the EU's new strict data privacy rules in May has triggered some 20 complaints at Ireland's data-protection authority, which is responsible for how Apple, Facebook, Google, Microsoft and other tech companies comply with the rules, the watchdog's deputy commissioner said today.

    Dale Sunderland said that Office of the Irish Data Protection Commissioner was going through the complaints — at the heart of which are well-known problems surrounding social media — "as expeditiously as possible."

    "We're already looking at those complex issues that have been talked about for a long period of time," Sunderland said at a conference* in Cambridge, UK.

    By Vesela Gladicheva

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